As a young parent, you might suspect your young children might have ADHD, yet you’re not really sure without some extensive observations. Even then, you might not have enough time to properly know without going to a doctor for an expert diagnosis.

ADHD is something most people don’t understand without experiencing it. You can say this about numerous mental illnesses, of course, though ADHD is even more complex.

Let’s take a look at cues in various settings to look out for in your kids behavior, that may be symptoms of ADHD:

Observations at Home

Since you’ll have more time at home to observe your children, you have three categories of ADHD to decipher. The first is inattention, the second is hyperactivity (or impulsiveness), and the third combines the first two.

Take some time to watch your children when they’re in the middle of an activity. If they avoid activities involving concentration (including homework), it’s a possible sign of ADHD.

Hyperactivity comes in being unable to sit still for any length of time, or an overactive mind.

When your kids have all signs above, it could cause more severe conditions like low self-esteem or severe depression.

Observations at School

It’s not always possible to observe your child’s behavior in school all day. Maybe if you spend one day with them there, you can find answers if the teachers aren’t trained to look out for ADHD symptoms.

In school, inattentiveness can come through not listening to directions when the teacher talks. Hyperactivity at school has many of the same situations you might notice at home. This could mean the inability to remain seated in class, or difficulty waiting in lines.

For cases where you think your child has a learning disorder, it might not always be related to ADHD. While it’s one symptom, if your child only has this problem, it could point to other factors.

Observations in the Doctor’s Office

Even if you take your child to see a doctor, the medical team may wait to properly diagnose ADHD until observing over time. Symptoms sometimes vary as a child grows up, so it could take some time until getting proper treatment.

Because so many other mental illnesses mimic ADHD behavior, the doctor needs to make sure it isn’t something else. Some examples include anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, or even something simple like consuming too much caffeine.

Medications to Help ADHD

Counseling usually comes first with ADHD treatment, yet many medications are available now to successfully treat this condition. Strattera is a commonly used drug that doesn’t use stimulants. Many times, though, stimulant drugs like Adderral get prescribed.

Antihypertensive drugs also get used on children and adults. However, the prices on these continue to skyrocket, no matter if you have insurance.

At searchRx, we have an app letting you save money on prescriptions to treat ADHD and all illnesses requiring expensive medications.